Get Eye Smart: Protecting Eyes Today, Saving Sight in the Future

Posted on May 20, 2020 by

Ultraviolet Awareness Month is sponsored by Prevent Blindness America to increase awareness of how UV rays can damage your eyes, increase your risk of cataracts and cancers of the eye especially in high-risk patients. UV protection with sunglasses is recommended in everyone, not only those that work outside, and can be preventative. As summer draws near north of the equator, many people long for the warmth of the sun after a long winter (at least in New England!) and plan for the outdoor activities we love. Unfortunately, the impacts of all that fun-in-the-sun on the eyes must be kept in mind.  Most people do not realize that 20% of all cataracts are the result of UV ray exposure, and that number has been dramatically increasing in recent years.

But what is this invisible threat exactly?  And how does it impact us? Ultraviolet radiation is measured in nanometers (nm). It is categorized in three basic terms and classified by the strength of the UV ray:

UVC: These rays are below 280 nm. The upper atmosphere absorbs these, so they do not reach us, therefore protection from these rays is not overly necessary.UVB: These are between 315 – 380 nm. These manage …
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OD Spotlight on Screening: Increasing optomap Acceptance Rates

Posted on May 08, 2020 by

Our eye care partners generally include optomap, the only single-capture ultra-widefield retinal image, as part of their standard comprehensive eye exam in order to facilitate early detection from vision impairment, blindness, and other systemic diseases. Retinal imaging elevates the standard of care but often requires patient consent and an out-of-pocket fee. By way of effectively educating the clinical benefits to the added screening, most patients accept the fee. Eric White, OD, explains how his practice has achieved a 90 percent acceptance rate for optomap imaging.

In his practice, Dr. White includes optomap screening as part of the pre-testing process and continues patient education in the exam room while requesting patient approval to review the images. By including the image as a part of the pre-test process, it is a “no-brainer” when its significance is explained. Prior to this method, Dr. White would forego taking the image during pre-testing and would wait until the process was explained in the exam room, if agreed, the patient would then be sent back to the pre-test area for the images to be taken. This was not only inefficient but patients would often rather not go back for yet another pre-test. Once Dr. White implemented …
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