Improving the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Through Visualization of the Retinal Periphery

Posted on Jan 27, 2016 by

More than 400 million people across the globe deal with diabetes. An additional 200 million are expected to be diagnosed between now and 2040, and up to a third of these patients will likely develop diabetic retinopathy (DR)1.

 

These increasing health challenges are driving the need for improved techniques to diagnosis and treat both DR and its common complications like diabetic macular edema (DME). One diagnostic tool – the visualization of the retinal periphery using ultra-widefield (UWF) retinal imaging – is providing the ophthalmic community with important insights about the pathology, progression and treatment of DR and associated complications.

 

About UWF Retinal Imaging

 

UWF imaging is performed by a specially-designed scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) that generates a high-resolution digital image capturing 200° or 82% of the retina. The SLO simultaneously uses two low-power lasers (red and green) that enable high-resolution, color imaging of retinal substructures.

 

Along with UWF color imaging, the technology also supports UWF fluorescein angiography (FA), UWF fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and UWF indocyanine green angiography (ICG).

 

Conventional 7 standard field (7SF) ETDRS photographs produce a comparatively narrow view (45° or less) of the center-portion of the retina. Peripheral portions are not imaged.

 

UWF Retinal Imaging’s Impact on DR …
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UWF Retinal Imaging of Patients with Recurrent Postvitrectomy Diabetic Vitreous Hemorrhage

Posted on Jan 20, 2016 by

A common complication arising from diabetic vitrectomy for the treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) is recurrent post vitrectomy diabetic vitreous hemorrhage (PVDVH). A recent study1 using ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (UWF FA) has generated new insights into the etiology of recurrent PVDVH. The study results also suggest that imaging of the peripheral retina may provide practitioners with superior, actionable post-operative information compared to conventional imaging techniques.

 

Multimodal UWF Retinal Imaging

 

UWF retinal imaging is performed using a specially-designed scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) that generates a high-resolution digital image – optomap – which captures 200° (or about 82%) of the retina. By contrast, conventional ETDRS 7 standard field (7SF) photographs produce a relatively narrow view (45° or less) of the center-portion of the retina.

 

For UWF color imaging, the SLO simultaneously scans the retina with two low-power lasers (red and green) that enable high resolution, color imaging of retinal substructures. The scan is completed in a single capture in less than a second, often without pupil dilation required. Along with UWF color imaging, the technology also supports ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (FA), UWF fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and UWF indocyanine green chorioangiography (ICG).

 

PVDVH Study Background

 

The study …
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Glaucoma Awareness Month

Posted on Jan 19, 2016 by

January is National Glaucoma Awareness month and in efforts to help educate the public on the disease here are a few facts you should know pertaining to your eye health:

 

Nearly 3 million people over the age of 40 have glaucoma and as the population ages the number is projected to grow steadily, increasing by nearly 50% to 4.3 million by 2032 according to the Prevent Blindness “Future of Vision: Forecasting the Prevalence and Costs of Vision Problems” report.

 

Glaucoma is often called the “the sneak thief of sight” because most people don’t notice the early symptoms. However, if it is detected and treated early enough vision loss may be decreased. Risk factors that increase your odds of glaucoma include: extreme nearsightedness, aging eyes, and a family history. For the best chance of early detection, regular, comprehensive eye exams should be conducted even if you have no symptoms.

 

It’s imperative to act fast to protect your vision! If you wait until after you’ve already experienced some vision loss to seek help you may not be able to restore your eye sight even with surgery or treatment – glaucoma typically affects your peripheral vision first. As the only ultra-widefield retinal imaging technology with a 200 degree view …
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Improved Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosis and Treatment with UWF Retinal Imaging

Posted on Jan 13, 2016 by

The statistics are clear. Over the next decade optometric and ophthalmic practices in North America, Europe and throughout the developed world will identify and treat an increasing number of patients with diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR). There are currently more than 40 million people in North America with diabetes and that number is expected to grow to over 50 million by 2025.1 In Europe, the number of those afflicted with the disease—currently over 60 million – will also see significant growth.These trends present practitioners with real challenges – first, how to more efficiently screen this large and growing population for signs of DR, and second, how to provide more informed and effective treatment at all stages of the disease.

Many practitioners are rising to these challenges with the help of a technology that has unique, proven capabilities in improving DR diagnosis and management – ultra-widefield (UWF™) retinal imaging.

 

Ultra-widefield Retinal Imaging

 

UWF imaging is performed by a specially-designed scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) that generates a high-resolution digital image which captures 200° (or about 82%) of the retina. Conventional techniques may image 45° or less of the retina. The SLO simultaneously scans using two low power lasers (red and green) that …
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Peripheral Lesions Associated with an Increased Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy Progression

Posted on Jan 05, 2016 by

 

The increasing use of ultra-widefield (UWF) retinal imaging is giving the optometric and ophthalmic communities a more comprehensive diagnostic platform as well as a powerful tool to explore the pathology and progression of a broad range of retinal diseases and conditions.

The diagnosis and study of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of several fields where UWF imaging is having particular impact. It’s estimated that over 400 million people across the globe are afflicted with diabetes and that number is expected to increase to over 600 million by 2040. As many as a third of those diagnosed with diabetes will also develop DR[1], a leading cause for blindness in adults. This growth is spurring the need for improved techniques for DR screening and diagnosis.

 

About UWF Retinal Imaging

Ultra-widefield imaging is performed by a specially designed scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) that generates a high-resolution digital image covering 200° (or about 82%) of the retina. The SLO simultaneously scans using two low-power lasers (red and green) that enable high resolution, color imaging of retinal substructures. The scan is produced in a single capture without pupil dilation. Along with UWF color imaging, the technology can also support ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography (FA), UWF fundus autofluorescence …
DATA CENTERS

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